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Photo#169704
J larvae - Mycetochara binotata

J larvae - Mycetochara binotata
Nashua, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA
February 14, 2008
Size: about 8 - 15 mm
I found these small, pale larvae in the very flaky, rotten core of a live maple tree. They had gravitated to the areas with more moisture. Superficially they resemble Tenebrio*nidae but the anal area has details I've never seen, nor do I recall ever having seen larvae that assumed this J-shaped posture. I hope these details will make an ID possible but in case not, I am intent on rearing these guys so we have an adult to ID.

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Moved
Moved from Mycetochara.

Moved

Moved
Moved from Beetles.

J larvae -- are "T-A" larvae!
Hi Jim, These look like alleculine Tenebrionidae larvae. The shape is not diagnostic, but it is typical. The microhabitat is also pretty typical, as seems to be the aggregating behavior. - Dan Young, Univ. Wisconsin.

 
Excellent!
Then I'll hope to put an adult alleculine in this photo series :-)

Thanks, Dan.

 
I've got adults!
I shot them night-before-last and will post in time. Meanwhile I can move these little guys where they belong.

BTW, the J shape of the larvae is apparently their inactive posture. They are straightened-out speed demons at room temperature.