Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Information, insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#1697959
Lake Crabtree leaf miner on Carex D1839 2019 1 - Taphrocerus nicolayi

Lake Crabtree leaf miner on Carex D1839 2019 1 - Taphrocerus nicolayi
Lake Crabtree County Park, Wake County, North Carolina, USA
July 22, 2019
not sure what this is--it may be a mine, but it is probably pretty old/empty/etc. I am sending just in case.

Images of this individual: tag all
Lake Crabtree leaf miner on Carex D1839 2019 1 - Taphrocerus nicolayi Lake Crabtree leaf miner on Carex D1839 2019 2 - Taphrocerus nicolayi Lake Crabtree leaf miner on Carex D1839 2019 3 - Taphrocerus nicolayi Lake Crabtree leaf miner on Carex D1839 2019 4 - Taphrocerus nicolayi

Moved
Moved from Taphrocerus.

See comment here:

Moved
Moved from Unidentified Leaf Mines.

I think there is a viable pupa inside.

 
Adult emerged
...so if you can confirm that this was Carex flaccosperma (or something else), that would be great.

 
This one may be difficult--I
This one may be difficult--I can't find the plant anymore, suggesting to me that its season is over (I am pretty sure I knew where I found it before, and today I can find nothing like it in the vicinity). I will look for it next summer... According to Eric Ungberg, this is in the Laxiflorae group (not C. flaccosperma), possibly C. blanda, but it could be something else. I won't be able to tell without Perigynia.

 
Cool! I will try to get IDs
Cool! I will try to get IDs for these...

 
D1824
Two Cosmopterix adults have emerged from D1824, which I take it you are confident is Carex flaccosperma.

 
Actually, I cannot completely
Actually, I cannot completely rule out C. glaucodea and C. pigra--these are both much less common than C. flaccosperma in this area. I'd need to take a better look at the reproductive structures to be sure, but I will try to do that. Due to the common species here, it is most likely C. flaccosperma. I am fairly confident it is one of these three.

 
Sad that I will not be able t
Sad that I will not be able to confirm the species involved until next spring/summer--the reproductive structures left from this season were all too old to give an accurate ID. I will revisit this next spring/summer. Great news about the Cosmopterix.

 
D1858
I also got a Cosmopterix from D1858.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.