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Photo#169812
Syrphid Fly - Sphaerophoria sulphuripes - female

Syrphid Fly - Sphaerophoria sulphuripes - Female
Aromas, San Benito County, California, USA
February 15, 2008
Size: ~8mm
Yet another Syrphid fly on Argyranthemum frutescens in our garden. (live oak/chaparral habitat). I scrolled through the Syrphids on this site, couldn't find an exact match but the closest match I could find is Sphaerophoria.

Images of this individual: tag all
Syrphid Fly - Sphaerophoria sulphuripes - female Syrphid Fly - Sphaerophoria sulphuripes Syrphid Fly - Sphaerophoria sulphuripes

Moved
Moved from Sphaerophoria.

Moved
Moved from Toxomerus.

I withdraw
My first assumption of it being Toxomerus.
After some study I've come to the conclusion that it's a female Sphaerophoria! So Gary was right with his first idea anyway!
So, female Sphaerophoria sp. it is!
Greetings

 
Thank you Gerard
for confirming the genus ID.

I think
It is a very dark female specimen in the genus Toxomerus.
Well visible (on the right side of the fly's head) in this picture is the distinct triangular emargination at the posterior margin of the eye, which is characteristic for the genus.
Greetings

 
Assuming Toxomerus...
This is most likely T. politus, based on shape of abdomen and admittedly obscure markings thereupon. (The only other candidates are T. marginatus and T. occidentalis.)

 
Thank you Gerard
for the genus ID. I've added another image which better shows "the distinct triangular emargination at the posterior margin of the eye which is characteristic for the genus."

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