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Species Tomonotus ferruginosus - Oak-leaf Grasshopper

Tomonotus ferruginosus - male Tomonotus ferruginosus - male Oak Leaf Grasshopper - Tomonotus ferruginosus - female Oak Leaf Grasshopper - Tomonotus ferruginosus - female Tomonotus ferruginosus - female Tomonotus - Tomonotus ferruginosus - female Tomonotus ferruginosus Tomonotus ferruginosus - female
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Orthoptera (Grasshoppers, Crickets, Katydids)
Suborder Caelifera (Grasshoppers)
Family Acrididae (Short-horned Grasshoppers)
Subfamily Oedipodinae (Band-winged Grasshoppers)
Tribe Arphiini
Genus Tomonotus
Species ferruginosus (Oak-leaf Grasshopper)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Tomonotus ferruginosus Caudell, 1905. Type locality: Fort Grant, Arizona
Range
Southeastern Arizona, and extreme southwestern New Mexico south through Sierra Madre Occidental region of northern Mexico.
Habitat
Mountain areas, mostly in arroyos and other low areas under Oak trees where leaf litter accumulates.
Life Cycle
overwinters as partly grown nymphs, with adults appearing mostly in March, April, and May, becoming less abundant in June and few lingering into July and later.
Internet References