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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#170002
unkown leaf bug - Homalodisca liturata

unkown leaf bug - Homalodisca liturata
Phoenix, Arizona, USA, maricopa County, Arizona, USA
May 28, 2004
Size: approx. .4 inches
Unknown leaf bug. This bug lives here around the year.

Images of this individual: tag all
unkown leaf bug - Homalodisca liturata unkown leaf bug - Homalodisca liturata unkown leaf bug - Homalodisca liturata unkown leaf bug - Homalodisca liturata unkown leaf bug - Homalodisca liturata unkown leaf bug - Homalodisca liturata

Moved

Homalodisca liturata
The smoketree sharpshooter is a common species on its arid-adapted host in AZ. It is readily distinguished from the glassy-winged sharpshooter by the pattern on the head and thorax - black lines on a pale ground, instead of pale spots on a dark ground.

Glassy-winged Sharpshooter

 
Misidentified
Unfortunately this picture is tagged incorrectly.

This is a smoketree sharpshooter. Homalodisca liturata. The dots on the head form wavy lines versus the spots on Homalodisca vitripennis (the glassy-wing sharpshooter).

Los Angeles County Agricultural Commissioner's Office)- has a good illustration of the difference between H. vitripennis and H. liturata.

From my experience, (we have both in Santa Clara County, California), though similar, the two species exhibit different behaviorial patterns when threatened. The smoketree will fall 'dead' and the glassy-wing will circle the branch (hiding) or fly off.

 
Two short parell cross red-veins can be seen
in the middle on some pictures, but only one seen this one. I'm not sure if the short cross veins are a ID feature between H. vitripennis and H. liturata.
I have one with two cross vein and will post soon.

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