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Photo#17048
Water Scavenger Beetle - Hydrophilus ovatus

Water Scavenger Beetle - Hydrophilus ovatus
Norwottuck Rail Trail, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, USA
May 8, 2005
Size: ~28 mm
Captured, photographed in a glass container, and released. I thought it might be a Water Scavenger, but I am not sure...does anyone know? I have several more shots I will post...

Images of this individual: tag all
Water Scavenger Beetle - Hydrophilus ovatus Water Scavenger Beetle - Hydrophilus ovatus Water Scavenger Beetle - Hydrophilus ovatus

(Dibolocelus) ovatus
This is not triangularis, but Hydrophilus ovatus (or Dibolocelus ovatus following older classifications). The main difference between the Hydrophilus s. str. and Dibolocelus lineages is that the latter has the prosternum divided into two lobes, while it is entire in the former. It is the only other species of really large Hydrophilid to cccur in North America, except for small pockets of H. insularis in the extreme south.

 
Thanks
Thank you Andrew...this is great to get a full ID on this large fella:)

Hydrophilidae.
Yes, this is a water scavenger beetle, perhaps Hydrophilus triangularis, though there is another large species in a different genus in the U.S.

 
Thanks Eric!
At least I know where to start now...

hmmmm...Tropisternus does look very similar, and "Peterson's..."(1) says they are a uniform color. Cedar Creek says they are a very dark green...but the average size is only 8-12 mm.

I don't think it is H.triangularis, because the body shape here seems more round, and less elongate. And, more significantly, my shots lack the groved/punctate(?) elytra that I see in "Peterson's Guide"...perhaps it is just one of the other 2 Hydrophilus species?

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