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Photo#1712303
Groom of Dracula - Stigmatomma pallipes - male

Groom of Dracula - Stigmatomma pallipes - Male
Meadowside Nature Center, Montgomery County, Maryland, USA
August 13, 2019
Size: 5mm
AFAIK, this is a male Stigmatomma pallipes. I found several of these males sitting on understory leaves in a fairly open forest. The guide's genus page says that there are 3 species of Stigmatomma in "our area" of which two are shown in the guide; S. pallipes and S. oregonense. The latter is out of range according to Antwiki. According to AntWiki, the 3rd U.S. species is S. trigonignathum, known only from 2 individuals collected in North Carolina. Somehow, I don't think I have to worry about that species for this ID :-)

There doesn't seem to be much of a consensus in the literature on the proper bionomial name of this ant. ITIS doesn't recognize the genus Stigmatomma at all, instead retaining Amblyopone. Nearctica doesn't include any of the above species names, instead listing S. serratum, S. subterranea, and S. wheeleri each in the same entry as Amblyopone pallipes.

I'd appreciate confirmation/correction of the ID. Thanks for the help.

Images of this individual: tag all
Groom of Dracula - Stigmatomma pallipes - male Groom of Dracula - Stigmatomma pallipes - male Groom of Dracula - Stigmatomma pallipes - male Groom of Dracula - Stigmatomma pallipes - male Groom of Dracula - Stigmatomma pallipes - male Groom of Dracula - Stigmatomma pallipes - male Groom of Dracula - Stigmatomma pallipes - male Groom of Dracula - Stigmatomma pallipes - male Groom of Dracula - Stigmatomma pallipes - male

Looks correct
Yoshimura & Fisher 2012 is the work that revised the old Amblyopone and resurrected Stigmatomma. A lot of taxonomy on arthropods is pretty outdated on a lot of sites that don't get updated, but for ants we have Bolton's Antcat, which has the full published taxonomic history of the species.
We don't know what the male of trigonignathum looks like, but it is probably very similar to or identical to the male of pallipes.

Moved from Ants.

 
Thanks
I saw references to that Yoshimura and Fisher paper but it's never clear to me whether the use of alternative names reflects outdated text or a lack of acceptance of a taxonomic change based on a single paper.

 
As it currently stands
Amblyopone is a group of large amblyoponine ants limited to Australia and the surrounding islands. This genus used to be a dumping ground for all sorts of medium sized to large amblyoponine ants worldwide with similar long toothy mandibles that now belong in genuses like Fulakora, Stigmatomma, and Xymmer.

I also threw up some info on the 5 species of amblyoponines we have in the US on the subfamily page if you're interested.

 
thanks
especially for adding info to the subfamily page.

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