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Photo#171600
Damselfly naiad.  A good possibility that it is a Pacific Forktail (Ischnura cervula)

Damselfly naiad. A good possibility that it is a Pacific Forktail (Ischnura cervula)
Sunnyvale, Santa Clara County, California, USA
February 29, 2008
Size: about 25mm
I saw three of these in the pond. All were on the edges of their lily pads where they could be partly in the water. I take it that they will be leaving the water before long. Does anyone know what type of naiad this is?

Images of this individual: tag all
Damselfly naiad.  A good possibility that it is a Pacific Forktail (Ischnura cervula) Damselfly naiad.  A good possibility that it is a Pacific Forktail (Ischnura cervula)

Damselfly naiad!
I'm guessing the term naiad would also apply to the midge nymph photos I submitted a while back.

Thanks for the link and ID help, Tom. I am optimistic about Identifying this one all the way to species! Tentatively, of course, and based on the fact that I have only seen one type of damselfly around my pond, and that would be the Pacific Forktail. And I have seen it many times, both male and female.

Now to take a look...

Damselfly larva
Here's the page to compare what some of them look like. You may get the genus, but species level isn't likely on these nymphs. Nice shot.

 
Not to be too nitpicky..
This is neither a nymph nor a larva, but more accurately termed a naiad. The difference being that this is an exopterygote that bears little resemblance to the adult form.

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