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Photo#1726657
Scaphinotus johnsoni (SEM collection) - Scaphinotus johnsoni

Scaphinotus johnsoni (SEM collection) - Scaphinotus johnsoni
Mount Arrowsmith, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada
August 10, 1955
Size: 18 mm
This is the first specimen of S. johnsoni collected and determined by George Ball from Vancouver Island at Mount Arrowsmith (near Port Alberni, BC). He and Lindroth returned to this location in 1958 and found an additional 3 individuals there as well as one individual from Sooke (unknown location). This specimen is held at the UBCZ Spencer Entomological Collection, which I examined in April 2019. At the time I snapped these photos for my personal record (so they are crude), but now it seems we're in need of images for this species!

Key characters:
-elongate lobes of the labium (c.f. angusticollis)
-2 or more setae on the anterior face (broad side) of the profemora --- this one has 3
-18-19 more or less regular elytral striae
-forebody black, elytra dark brown or usually violaceous with iridescent blue/green elytral margins
-more shiny than angusticollis
-smaller than angusticollis, with similar elytral sculpture, but the legs are less prolonged

Images of this individual: tag all
Scaphinotus johnsoni (SEM collection) - Scaphinotus johnsoni Scaphinotus johnsoni (SEM collection) - Scaphinotus johnsoni Scaphinotus johnsoni (SEM collection) - Scaphinotus johnsoni Scaphinotus johnsoni (SEM collection) - Scaphinotus johnsoni Scaphinotus johnsoni (SEM collection) - Scaphinotus johnsoni

Kudos on excellent presentation of Scaphinotus johnsoni --
new to BugGuide! I will mark this page as a key reference for this species which is not yet represented in my synoptic set. I hope to see more of your detailed posts (of Carabidae) which don't necessarily need to be species new to BugGuide.

 
Thanks!
I don't often make the time for these detailed posts but I had examined it recently and we had another specimen IDd as this previously in Bugguide which turned out to be a variant of angusticollis. So with that observation removed I really wanted to fill the void here. Cheers!

 
Scaphinotus angusticollis vs johnsoni
My rule of thumb is that S. johnsoni is almost always small that angusticollis, it has narrow shoulders (forward edge of the elytra at the hind angke of the prothorax), and the linear straie on the elytra are more deeply etched (an more obvious). S. angusticollis is a widespread native weed species (certainly not a narrow molluscivore) that can be a pain in the butt if your run traps where it is common; where as S. johnsoni is an very special, small-range endemic that makes a fantastic addition to any collection. I have looked for it numerous times on Mt. Arrowsmith without any luck. However I have found it at many other locales from north end of Vanc I to se slope of the Olympic Mtns. I recommend looking for it along the margins and elsewhere in the riparian zone of small creeks if you do not have time to run pitfalls.

As Charlene has mentioned on a different post, S. angusticollis is one a handful of coastal disjunct that has somehow been able to establish itse,lf in the Inland Rainforest Region in the Central and North Selkirks in seBC (but not south of there).

James Bergdahl
Spokane, WA, USA

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