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Photo#174310
Another red-legged carabid - Harpalus rufipes

Another red-legged carabid - Harpalus rufipes
Colrain, Franklin County, Massachusetts, USA
April 18, 2004
In garden. The second image, though even worse than the first, better shows the fine, reflective pubescence, which I'm hoping is a distinctive character...

Images of this individual: tag all
Another red-legged carabid - Harpalus rufipes Another red-legged carabid - Harpalus rufipes

not H.affinis
Nearctica lists H.rufipes, which is a species common in gardens in Europe, and looks just like your beetle. Size of that species is about 15-18mm.
Don´t take this for an ID, please. I can´t tell whether there is a native american species with which it could be confused. Maybe Peter knows?

 
Harpalus rufipes
appears right. Thanks Boris! I had overlooked this rather obvious choice, i.e., a Harpalus with characteristic yellowish dense vestiture on elytra unlike much shorter & sparser hairs of smaller H. affinis. I've never seen a specimen of H. rufipes and wish I had a specimen for my carabid reference collection. It definitely is an *introduced* species to the northeast.

 
introduced
That makes sense to me--I often see what I believe to be the same species running across the sidewalks of Burlington, VT.

Carabidae : tribe Harpalini
is safe based on body shape. The harpalines with densely pubescent elytra in my area come to mind: Amphasia, Ophonus, few Harpalus spp. If pinned down to one species I would guess Harpalus affinis based on apparent pronotal shape, but there is not enough photographic detail to be sure. [Revised to Harpalus rufipes in subsequent note]

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