Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

National Moth Week photos of insects and people. Here's how to add your images.

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa


Photo#1744485
what insect prevents chlorophyll from breaking down in poplar leaves

what insect prevents chlorophyll from breaking down in poplar leaves
Hartland, Windsor County, Vermont, USA
October 26, 2019
I believe an insect causes small sections of trembling and big-tooth aspen leaves to retain their chlorophyll and continue photosynthesizing in order for the insect to obtain food. I do not know the identity of the insect and would love to.

You might want to...
... ask a botanist or an arborist about this. Show them that picture, or one like it. Plant nurseries, cooperative extensions, park rangers, and high school or college biology departments are among the possible places to find people who might know.

There are a lot of things that can make leaves fall off before they've fully changed color.

The most visible damage in your picture is the brown spots on the yellow/red areas, a dark linear area along the bottom of the right main rib, and a brown patch near the bottom of the green area. Also, a darkened area on the petiole (leaf stalk). It's not clear to me whether any of these things are due to insects.

If this is occurring only with the aspen species you mention, and not other kinds of trees in the vicinity, that's worth mentioning.

 
poplar leaf
Thanks so much, Kurt. I have discovered it is probably Ectoedemia argyropeza.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.