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Species Neotridactylus apicialis - Larger Pygmy Mole Grasshopper

Neotridactylus apicialis? - Neotridactylus apicialis Neotridactylus apicialis tiny sand dwelling orthopteran - Neotridactylus apicialis Neotridactylus apicialis Neotridactylus apicialis Neotridactylus apicialis Neotridactylus apicialis Neotridactylus apicialis
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Orthoptera (Grasshoppers, Crickets, Katydids)
Suborder Caelifera (Grasshoppers)
Family Tridactylidae (Pygmy Mole 'Crickets')
Genus Neotridactylus
Species apicialis (Larger Pygmy Mole Grasshopper)
Other Common Names
Larger Sand Cricket (1)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Orig. Comb: Tridactylus apicalis Say 1825
Explanation of Names
apicalis is probably a reference to the "bristly appendages" at the tip of the abdomen (1)
Size
5.5-10 mm (1)
Identification
Differs from the smaller sand cricket (Ellipes minutus) by being larger and having hind tarsi (1)
Range
Eastern N. Amer., west to s. CA / s. to C. Amer. (1)
Habitat
Often found in sandy habitats near water (1)
Food
Organic material such as algae (1)
Life Cycle
Tend to be gregarious (1)
Works Cited
1.Field Guide To Grasshoppers, Katydids, And Crickets Of The United States
John L. Capinera, Ralph D. Scott, Thomas J. Walker. 2004. Cornell University Press.