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Photo#174587
small, active larva, red oak bark - Canifa pallipes

small, active larva, red oak bark - Canifa pallipes
Nashua, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA
March 26, 2008
Size: about 5 mm
This almost mely*rid-looking (to me anyway) larva was the only one of its kind I encountered while stripping bark from a 2-3-year-dead red oak I toppled. It was one of several unknown subcortical larva types I discovered inhabiting this tree. Unless I overlooked the larva I'm thinking of, this little guy was another one-and-a-half millimeters longer, trailing a fleshy caboose that vanished before I got around to shooting my specimens.

Okay, I now think this is a larval scraptiid. I've just revisited images I took of one in New Mexico and the morphology is very similar, including the fleshy caboose: In a comment on that page Kieth Bayless says scraptiid larvae are very rare in collections and that they lose their "caboose" just prior to pupating. That means this little guy may actually be a pupa as I type this. I'll check in a few minutes :-)

Images of this individual: tag all
small, active larva, red oak bark - Canifa pallipes small, active larva, red oak bark, now an imago (adult) - Canifa pallipes small, active larva, red oak bark, now an imago (adult) - Canifa pallipes small, active larva, red oak bark, now an imago (adult) - Canifa pallipes small, active larva, red oak bark, now an imago (adult) - Canifa pallipes

Moved
Moved from Canifa.

Moved

Canifa
The only New Hampshire species with a caboose, which this one had when I collected it, is Canifa.

Well, I did look for the larva (or pupa)
but it must have crawled inside one of the pieces of oak bark in the container. I'll just have to keep my eyes open for the adult when/if it ecloses.

 
Opened container April 15 to find adult!
See attached images.

Moved
Moved from Beetles.

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