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Photo#174739
Ravine Trapdoor Spider - Cyclocosmia truncata - female

Ravine Trapdoor Spider - Cyclocosmia truncata - Female
Rome, Floyd County, Georgia, USA
March 27, 2008
Cyclocosmia truncata, from behind. The tough, flattened abdomen is this species' defining characteristic and serves as their primary method of defense against intruders. When threatened, Cyclocosmia truncata faces head-down in its burrow, locks itself in place, and uses its abdomen as a plug to deter attackers. I believe this is a defense tactic that prevents predatory wasps from stinging/pulling the spider out of its burrow. This part of their body is usually all that I see of them in the wild.

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Ravine Trapdoor Spider - Cyclocosmia truncata - female Ravine Trapdoor Spider - Cyclocosmia truncata - female Ravine Trapdoor Spider - Cyclocosmia truncata - female Ravine Trapdoor Spider - Cyclocosmia truncata - female Ravine Trapdoor Spider - Cyclocosmia truncata - female