Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Information, insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Records of Coleoptera as prey of robber flies (Diptera: Asilidae) in eastern New Mexico and west Texas.
By Pollock, D.A. and R.J. Lavigne.
Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington, 121(1): 81-102., 2019
Cite: 1754867
BioOne

Pollock, D.A. and R.J. Lavigne. 2019. Records of Coleoptera as prey of robber flies (Diptera: Asilidae) in eastern New Mexico and west Texas. Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington, 121(1): 81-102.

Abstract

Two hundred and ninety-three records for 20 families of Coleoptera (excluding Carabidae) preyed upon by 36 species (in 18 genera) of robber flies (Diptera: Asilidae) in eastern New Mexico and adjacent west Texas are listed. Among genera of asilid predators, individuals of Heteropogon Loew, 1847 (4 spp.) were responsible for 54.6% of all Coleoptera prey records, followed by Efferia Coquillett, 1893 (7 spp.) with 10.2% and Diogmites Loew, 1866 (3 spp.) with 9.2%. The three genera of asilids with the highest percentage of beetle prey among all insect and spider prey collected were Ospriocerus Loew, 1866 (41% of 44 records), Heteropogon Loew, 1847 (23% of 814 records) and Proctacanthus Macquart, 1838 (10% of 440 records).

Four families of beetles accounted for 72% of prey records: 33% were Chrysomelidae (comprising 16 species), 18% Scarabaeidae (15 species), 11% Tenebrionidae (4 species), and 10% Melyridae (6 species).

Data are presented on the prey composition for each of the 18 asilid genera documented in this paper. Comments are made on the top three asilid genera and specific beetle families that were relatively well represented among the prey records; photographs of localities mentioned in the paper are provided.