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Photo#17604
Eastern Toe Biter - Lethocerus uhleri

Eastern Toe Biter - Lethocerus uhleri
Fort Bragg, Cumberland County, North Carolina, USA
May 17, 2005
Size: 53 mm (over 2 inches)
Found this giant water bug in the parking lot at the school.

Images of this individual: tag all
Eastern Toe Biter - Lethocerus uhleri Eastern Toe Biter - Lethocerus uhleri

Moved
Moved from Eastern Toe-Biter.

Moved
Moved from Uhler's Water Bug.

Moved
Moved from Giant Water Bug.

GIANT WATER BUG
I found a simular bug on the beach at Gulf Shores, Al. It seemed
very aggresive. Is this a natural instinct for this bug?

I just found one of these
I just found one of these today in Shreveport, Louisiana. From what i've been reading they are usually farther north. It's 110 degree heat index over here right now so if he likes the cooler weather he chose the wrong place. Sry i can't take a picture, oh well, bye.

ID
I'm not positive if it's this one or Benacus griseus?

 
another character
Apparently there's another distinguishing feature in addition to the one Chris mentioned: in Lethocerus griseus, the outer margin of the hind tibia is "broadly curved" versus "nearly straight" in L. americanus. (the ITIS site calls Benacus griseus an invalid name - a junior synonym of Lethocerus griseus)

 
ID
Lethocerus americanus can be distinguished from Benacus griseus by a groove in each front femur into which the tibia fits when the leg is folded.

 
Great
Thanks for the tips. I am guessing that this is ID'd properly then. I don't see any curving of the tibia.

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