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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#176502
Major Sallow - Feralia major

Major Sallow - Feralia major
Groton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA
April 10, 2008

Images of this individual: tag all
Major Sallow - Feralia major Major Sallow - Feralia major

Looking at Vargo Plates
it appears that this species has significant sexual dimorphism. All of our images so far appear female?

Female


Male


Male

 
All females??
Tom's is a male and mine is a male. Not sure that there is any sexual dimorphism apart from the usual antennal differences. There are, however, colour differences associated with latitude. The northern specimens seem always to be very dark, the southern specimens are green (not sure whether there are dark specimens in the south).
I think Vargo's plates just show the variation in colour.

 
Thanks
for the info. Noted. That's what I get for making deductions based on limited data. :(

Perhaps that info could go on the "Info" page for the species so it can be easily accessed?

Thanks Dick and Tony
Moved from Moths.

One of the Sallow moths possibly.
I was just looking at the Feralia deceptiva I caught yesterday and noted the similarity. How about F. major possibly?

 
Definitely
major

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