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Genus Calamomyia

Cecidomyiidae, prairie grass - Calamomyia Cecidomyiidae, prairie grass - Calamomyia Cecidomyiidae, prairie grass - Calamomyia Cecidomyiidae, prairie grass - Calamomyia Cecidomyiidae, prairie grass - Calamomyia Cecidomyiidae, prairie grass - Calamomyia Cecidomyiidae, prairie grass, adult - Calamomyia Cecidomyiidae, prairie grass, adult - Calamomyia
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Diptera (Flies)
No Taxon ("Nematocera" (Non-Brachycera))
Infraorder Bibionomorpha (Gnats, Gall Midges, and March Flies)
Superfamily Sciaroidea (Fungus Gnats and Gall Midges)
Family Cecidomyiidae (Gall Midges and Wood Midges)
Subfamily Cecidomyiinae (Gall Midges)
Supertribe Lasiopteridi
Tribe Alycaulini
Genus Calamomyia
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Calamomyia Gagné 1969
Explanation of Names
"Calamomyia means 'culm fly.' It seems an appropriate name for this genus because all the included species for which some biology is known were reared from grass stems." (Gagné, 1969)
Numbers
19 described species, all from eastern USA
Life Cycle
"Eggs are laid on the growing tips of young grasses in spring. Larvae find their way into the culm and crawl along the center of the stem. They do not cause any gall or swelling as such. They overwinter as larvae and pupate and emerge the following year. Most American grasses will have a species of this genus in the culms." (Ray Gagné email to John van der Linden)