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Photo#17675
Carolina Copris - Dichotomius carolinus

Carolina Copris - Dichotomius carolinus
Treyburn area, Durham County, North Carolina, USA
May 10, 2005
Size: 25 mm
This beetle was found dead beside my car in a parking lot in the afternoon. It had probably hit a streetlight the night before and just happened to land there. I've not found this beetle alive--it appears to be rather uncommon in my area.

Images of this individual: tag all
Carolina Copris - Dichotomius carolinus Carolina Copris - Dichotomius carolinus Carolina Copris - Dichotomius carolinus Carolina Copris - Dichotomius carolinus Carolina Copris - Dichotomius carolinus

Our biggest Dung Beetle
Probably not uncommon up there, but you would have to do some digging around their food - most people don't, or won't admit it! They do come to light, only infrequently. Good addition to guide.

 
more...
Well, several years later, I've found a couple more of these. One I found dead in the same parking lot (probably came to a light), and I just had one hit my kitchen window tonight, attracted to the light. I caught it because I recognized that it was a bigger thud than the Phyllophaga hitting the window.
So it seems they may come to lights in spring?

 
I've found them at lights many times
I've seen them late May to late August on Block Island. In June and July they're especially common. In fact, last week I found seven at the porch lights in one night.

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