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Photo#1773528
Cicindela duodecimguttata

Cicindela duodecimguttata
Here is a comparison of more heavily-marked specimens of Cicindela duodecimguttata compared to C. repanda. One error many people appear to make when trying to distinguish these two species is believing that C. duodecimguttata always have significantly reduced markings. This is certainly not always the case, as is evident in these photos. Thus, maculation is not always consistent, although I have never seen a C. duodecimguttata with a marginal band that reaches the humeral lunule. However, the ground color of C. duodecimguttata consistently has less red mixed with green in the microsculpture, and the ventral color of C. duodecimguttata is predominantly blue with red under the thorax. In C. repanda the ventral color is bluish green with reddish spreading over much more of the ventral surface.

In addition, habitat preference of these two species is actually somewhat different overall. While they can often be found together at some sites, especially on silty sands, they are more often found apart. Clean sandy beaches most often are dominated by C. repanda and, if only lightly disturbed, often C. hirticollis. Muddy, silty, or shalely moist areas are usually dominated by C. duodecimguttata and often C. tranquebarica in the west. I find that C. repanda avoids areas unless they have at least some sand. Once one gets familiar with these two species they will find that even their foraging and especially flight behaviors differ. For example, when alarmed, C. duodecimguttata tyically flies at least 0.3-1 m higher above the substrate than C. repanda, and usually for distances of 5-15 m farther and has more a move wavering flight.

I suppose after chasing tiger beetles around for 35 years I am largely to the point where I can mostly tell these two species apart from 5-10 m away based on the previously mentioned features of behavior and appearance. However, they do require a bit of experience to become familiar with.

Images of this individual: tag all
Cicindela duodecimguttata Cicindela duodecimguttata - male Cicindela duodecimguttata - male Cicindela duodecimguttata - male Cicindela duodecimguttata - male Cicindela duodecimguttata - male Cicindela duodecimguttata - male Cicindela duodecimguttata - male Cicindela duodecimguttata - male Cicindela duodecimguttata - male Cicindela duodecimguttata - male Cicindela duodecimguttata - male

This is a really great educational piece
on separating potentially similar Cicindela duodecimguttata and C. repanda. I will flag it for future reference. Matt, a similar short note in the journal "Cicindela" would certainly extend your audience.

 
I suppose it would certainly
I suppose it would certainly be useful, but I am not sure if it would warrant a full short note. I think I already have 2-3 papers in review in that journal already.

 
bucolica
The heavily marked duodecimguttata are what Casey called "bucolica". I was already on the Canadian prairies when I took up tiger beetle collecting so I learned from the start how to distinguish heavily marked duodecimguttata from repanda. They can be a little tricky but the shape of the pronotum always works if nothing else. There is a photo of an aberrant duodecimguttata from Alberta where the marginal band is connected.

 
for some reason it's not lett
for some reason it's not letting me upload a photo...

 
I had the same issue. It app
I had the same issue. It appears the only way is to upload it as an entry and then insert the link into the comment.

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