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Photo#178540
1st instar cat - Lymantria dispar

1st instar cat - Lymantria dispar
Marlton, Burlington County, New Jersey, USA
April 23, 2008
Size: Maybe around 4 mm?
I think that this may be an early instar of a Gypsy Moth (Lymantria dispar). I tried to measure it and it crawled on my ruler.
http://bugguide.net/node/view/8780/bgimage

This page http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/plaveg/pestrava/lymdis/tech/lymdise.shtml states...
"Larva: The 1st (3 mm) and 3rd (7 mm) instars are black with long hairs; the 2nd instar (5 mm) is brown with short hairs. Instars 4, 5 and 6 are similar to each other and may be light to dark gray with flecks of yellow. They have long hairs that may be dark or golden and have 2 rows of tubercles along the back. Normally 5 pairs of blue tubercles are followed by 6 pairs of red, however variations are known to occur including all 11 pairs of tubercles being blue."

Images of this individual: tag all
1st instar cat - Lymantria dispar 1st instar cat - Lymantria dispar

used to ID this

Moved
Moved from Frass.

Frassed
Moved from ID Request. The guide already has enough unidentifiable "Caterpillars"

 
Can't tell much of the color
but the shape certainly suggests Lymantria. We would agree with your ID. Gypsy moth looks like a fine fit for your images.

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