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Species Microhexura montivaga - Spruce Fir Moss Spider

Microhexura montivaga Microhexura montivaga Microhexura montivaga Microhexura montivaga Microhexura montivaga Microhexura montivaga Microhexura montivaga
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Chelicerata (Chelicerates)
Class Arachnida (Arachnids)
Order Araneae (Spiders)
Infraorder Mygalomorphae (Mygalomorphs)
Family Microhexuridae
Genus Microhexura
Species montivaga (Spruce Fir Moss Spider)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Microhexura montivaga Crosby & Bishop, 1925
Range
Certain mountains in western North Carolina, eastern Tennessee, and southwest Virginia (USFWS, 2011)
Habitat
Spruce/fir forests, typically damp, but well-drained moss mats growing on rocks and boulders in well-shaded areas (USFWS, 2011)
Food
Most likely springtails and mites
Remarks
Listed as endangered by the US Fish & Wildlife Service since 1995. Main threat is the invasive exotic Balsam Wooly Adelgid, which is killing off Fraser Fir trees over large areas of the souther Appalachians (to which the spider is endemic). The spider lives exclusively under lush mats of moss; if the trees are killed, the moss below is dessicated and dies, leaving the spider without habitat.
Print References
Crosby, C. R. & Bishop, S. C. (1925). Two new spiders from the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina. Entomological News 36: 142-146.
USFWS (2011). Spruce-fir moss spider, Microhexura montivaga PDF
Internet References
Farewell to the World’s Smallest Tarantula? National Wildlife magazine, 10-19-17