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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#1786312
Pogonomyrmex californicus? - Pogonomyrmex californicus

Pogonomyrmex californicus? - Pogonomyrmex californicus
Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge, Yuma County, Arizona, USA
March 7, 2020
Coordinates: 32.105410, -113.467804
Elevation: 733 ft

Greater resolution image here

Images of this individual: tag all
Pogonomyrmex californicus? - Pogonomyrmex californicus Pogonomyrmex californicus? - Pogonomyrmex californicus Pogonomyrmex californicus? - Pogonomyrmex californicus Pogonomyrmex californicus? - Pogonomyrmex californicus Pogonomyrmex californicus? - Pogonomyrmex californicus Pogonomyrmex californicus? - Pogonomyrmex californicus

Yes, californicus
Circumocular whorls diagnostic for the species are clearly visible in the higher resolutions of these pictures.

Moved from Ants.

 
Outstanding!
Thank you Steven! I was struggling between P. californicus and P. bicolor, but the comments by David Louis Quinn helped me figure it out: "P. bicolor is seldom seen, and can be differentiated from the bicolored variety of P. californicus by the profile of the thorax, the propodeal spines in P. bicolor (often well-developed), the very fine 'silky' cephalic rugosity in P. bicolor, ventral hairs on the petiolar peduncle of P. bicolor, and P. bicolor's obvious lobe, also on the venter of the peduncle."

 
No problem!
bicolor is definitely not out of the question for that far south in AZ. If you want to get into handwavy species dets instead of hard characters (infinitely more useful in the field in my opinion) it is very helpful to think of Pogos within the four species groups that I put up on the guide - there is a overview of them on the genus page.

I'll put up a general description of the groups sometime when I have time, but bicolor is in the barbatus group which are usually larger ants and heavier built, about 5-10mm generally. californicus is in the californicus group, which are quite thin Pogonomyrmex and often smaller, around 5-9mm, generally without propodeal spines (comanche is an exception). Obviously they're almost the same in length, but the thin vs wide ant thing does seem to hold kind of true. I personally haven't seen californicus as large as they are claiming in the key (5.5-8.7mm) but I'm sure they're out there. For reference the key says the range for bicolor is 7.2-8.2mm.

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