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Photo#179108
White-stripped finback moth - Acleris flavivittana

White-stripped finback moth - Acleris flavivittana
University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire, USA
April 25, 2008
Size: 1.5 cm
Do males of all moths have feathery antennae, or just most species?
This moth has smooth antenna.

Images of this individual: tag all
White-stripped finback moth - Acleris flavivittana White-stripped finback moth - Acleris flavivittana

Moved
Moved from Tortricid Moths to Acleris senescens. ID based on this image:

Moved
Moved from Moths.

Superfamily Tortricoidea
I looked through bug guide & the closest group I could find that this guy could fit into was the Superfamily Tortricoidea.
Still not sure...

Feathery antennae
I can't help you in this specific case, but in general the answer is no: not all species have males with feathery antennae.

I'm sure it depends on how much a given species relies on pheromones for males to locate the females: the feathery structures give the males' antennae more surface area to pick up pheromone molecules out of the air.

The general rule is that feathery antennae indicate a male, but lack of them indicates a female only in those species where the males would be expected to have them.

There's an article in the forums on the topic, which you might find interesting.

 
Thanks!
This really helps. C:

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