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Photo#179113
Acrididae nymph - Melanoplus bivittatus - female

Acrididae nymph - Melanoplus bivittatus - Female
Durham, Durham County, North Carolina, USA
April 25, 2008
Size: less than 1"
Is this a grasshopper nymph in the family Acrididae? Do all mature male and female grasshoppers have wings? Thanks!

Moved

Moved

Melanoplus bivittatus
This is a very young nymph of this species. It will be rather large and have fully developed wings when it grow up, but there are barely any indications of them at this age (looks like 2nd out of 5 instars = growth stages between molts). And yes, as Chuck stated, there are species that are totally wingless or have short wings (a few species that can have long or short wings in different individuals); however, this isn't one of them.

Wingless adults
I can't help you on your first question, but I can tell you that there are definitely small-winged and/or wingless adults in several grasshopper species.

If grasshoppers are like some other taxonomic groups, there should be some species where all are wingless, others where one sex is wingless, and still others where winglessness is part of normal variation: some have wings and others don't- even within the same area and within the same sex.

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