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Photo#180651
Guess who - Neomida bicornis

Guess who - Neomida bicornis
Nashua, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA
I found several of these larvae in my dried fungus scrap rearing container. Most were inhabiting a tough white polypore. I placed them , along with some of the fungus, in a separate cubicle so I could find out what they turned into.

Images of this individual: tag all
Guess who - Neomida bicornis Guess who - Neomida bicornis Guess who - Neomida bicornis Guess who - Neomida bicornis Guess who - Neomida bicornis Here's who: - Neomida bicornis - male Here's who: - Neomida bicornis - male Here's who: - Neomida bicornis - male

Do you have
images of the damage to the fungus by any chance? I want to try to figure out who's responsible for the exit holes and galleries I often see in polypores etc.

 
There are many fungus feeders.
I didn't notice exit holes, just larvae and adults inside the fungus. I checked on my two pupae immediately after posting these images. Both had eclosed. I'll post pix soon.

 
Many...
Yes, I know it's probably a hopeless quest, but I'm wondering if there are certain fungus feeders that leave characteristic signs (for instance, I often see round exit holes of more than a quarter inch in diameter; recently I've found several birch polypores with neat galleries like those of wood-boring beetles), while others simply leave the fungus in a powdery mess.

Congratulations on another successful rearing!

 
Most common in soft birch conks
is this species although I have found adult Platy*dema and Ciid*ae in them as well. (Asterisks added to foil searches for those terms from showing this image.)

Are you sure you don't want to hazard a guess here before I post the teneral adult images? The pupal images contain a very strong clue.

 
my guess
Here's my guess.

 
Bingo!
A couple of males. I'll post tenerals in a bit.

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