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Photo#18093
Darkling Beetle - Tenebrio obscurus

Darkling Beetle - Tenebrio obscurus
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, USA
May 21, 2005
Size: 18mm
Looks similar to Alobates, open to suggestion. These were found inside of a home, the owner's report that chewing sounds can be heard in the woodwork.

Images of this individual: tag all
Darkling Beetle - Tenebrio obscurus Darkling Beetle - Tenebrio obscurus Darkling Beetle - Tenebrio obscurus

Moved
Moved from Zophobas.

Moved
Moved from Tenebrioninae.

What about Tenebr*io opacus?
. . . To me it looks like a big male of it, and habitat would fit also. Dear Kanchan, please think about it. You will have the last word!

 
vote for T. obscurus
(i guess 'opacus' was just a slip of tongue, Boris)

 
obscurus
(i guess 'opacus' was just a slip of tongue, Boris)

Yeah, it was! Actually, the species are similar, but opacus is strictly palearctic.

 
ID confirmed by W.E. Steiner: T. obscurus

Moved
Moved from Darkling Beetles.

Tenebrioninae
Definitely a Tenebrioninae, leaning towards Zophobas sp.

Not A. pennsylvanica
Nice shots. Body shape is much like pennsylvanica, and if form follows function in this case, it probably occupies a similar habitat. A. pennsylvanica adults allegedly eat under-bark insects, but their larvae no doubt eat wood. Some tenebrionid larvae at least can live in rather dry wood, so maybe the larvae are eating the house!

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