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Photo#187373
Fullerton Bee #6 - Calliopsis rhodophila - female

Fullerton Bee #6 - Calliopsis rhodophila - Female
Fullerton Arboretum, Fullerton, Orange County, California, USA
April 21, 2008

Images of this individual: tag all
Fullerton Bee #6 - Calliopsis rhodophila - female Fullerton Bee #6 - Calliopsis rhodophila - female

Moved

Moved

Moved
Moved from Calliopsis.

Calliopsis
sensu Shinn, 1967

female

Calliopsis pugionis is the only species I know to occur in this vicinity

What plants does it visit?

 
Thanks, John.
I've seen these only twice. Both times, they landed on twigs on the trail and weren't really close to any plants. I'm amazed at how many bees simply plop down while I'm walking, many landing in sand. (That's part of the reason I thought a bluish bee was a bembicine wasp in a recent post.)

(Written a little later) Just reviewed my past posts which included one "plunker" as described above, plus several on mustard. I'll keep looking.

 
Another plunker
I saw one or two of these today on rocks lining a flower bed at Riley Wilderness Park. The one(s) in question would touch down on a rock, take off, fly several feet, then repeat the action. Didn't see any feeding this time, either.

 
Today, I saw one feeding at Irvine Regional Park.
It was alone, rotating from a small, flat, grey rock to a small bunch of low mustard plants. It was definitely feeding there, touching down briefly on one blossom, then another. After about five flowers, it would return briefly to the rock for several touch-and-go landings there.

A couple hundred feet away was a group, engaged in courtship behavior. The touch-and-goes were chiefly on a light grey concrete curb. A bush sunflower plant was adjacent, but I saw no feeding.

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