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Photo#187826
Quick Wasp, likely P. coquilletti - Pseudomasaris coquilletti - female

Quick Wasp, likely P. coquilletti - Pseudomasaris coquilletti - Female
Irvine Park, Orange, Orange County, California, USA
March 31, 2008
One of those "touch and go" critters that seem to be practicing landings incessantly. Companion photo, to be frassed, shows a diferent individual in flight.

Images of this individual: tag all
Quick Wasp, likely P. coquilletti - Pseudomasaris coquilletti - female Quick Wasp - Pseudomasaris coquilletti - female

Moved
Moved from Pseudomasaris.

I agree with Richard -
Markings, especially the yellow of the upper orbits produced toward the ocelli, make this coquilletti. She's probably picking up mud for building her cells. The challenge for you, Ron, is to find those nest cells somewhere on a rock or similar surface. Something to do until next spring when you'll be able to find them in Phacelia spp. They're still flying in the mountains where Phacelia is still in bloom (see my recent post of this species).

 
Thanks, Hartmut.
...

Pseudomasaris sp. - female (Masarinae)
I would lean for P. coquilletti, but confirmation by a North-American expert is needed. I think this would be a pity to frass the female in flight, albeit a little blurry.

 
Thanks, Richard
I've restored the in-flight shot, per your suggestion.

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