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Photo#189677
Young male Golden-Winged Dragonfly - Libellula flavida - male

Young male Golden-Winged Dragonfly - Libellula flavida - Male
Cass County, Texas, USA
June 10, 2008
Size: 2"
I think this is the correct ID and sex for this species but I am never positive, lol.

Lee

Images of this individual: tag all
Young male Golden-Winged Dragonfly - Libellula flavida - male Young male Golden-Winged Dragonfly 2 - Libellula flavida - male

Young male but,
we believe this to be a Yellow-sided Skimmer (Libellula flavida). Yours is a young male but the best match we could find was our images of a female as can be seen here.
Note the dark wingtips, bi-colored stigma, yellow veins below the costa and darker areas on the wings near the thorax.
As is usually the case, an additional view from the side would have been most valuable.
You should probably wait for further comments before moving it.
Gayle & Jeanell

(Edit at 11:42) We see that the Balabans have been busy while we were puzzling over your photo! We would say that the yellow side of the thorax as seen on your second photo and the supporting comments of John & Jane are sufficient confirmation for L. flavida.
Fine photos!
G & J

The dark vein on the leading edge of the wings
would lead us to say needhami instead, but we associate dark wingtips with females in that species, and this is definitely male. We wonder if you haven't got the more unusual Libellula flavida here?? Info can be found in the guide here. We'll see if we can't get Gayle to take a look at this if one of the other Odonate experts doesn't chime in. We agree - great pic! Did you get any shots from a different aspect?

not my area of knowledge (lit
not my area of knowledge (little as that may be), but i just wanted to say you got a lovely shot.
Nina

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