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Photo#1898641
North Carolina Sand Wasp - Isodontia mexicana - male

North Carolina Sand Wasp - Isodontia mexicana - Male
Davidson, North Carolina, USA
August 5, 2020
Photo taken by Rob Van Epps and posted to inaturalist here

Images of this individual: tag all
North Carolina Sand Wasp - Isodontia mexicana - male North Carolina Sand Wasp - Isodontia mexicana - male

Moved

 
could this be apicalis as well?
sorry if i am showing my ignorance, but i think both heve white hair, and dark wings, and are hard to differentiate

 
From the iNat link
From the iNat link, there's a slight brown spot on T1 that isn't known to occur in I. apicalis. Otherwise, dark-winged specimens can indeed be difficult to separate, especially males. Females differ in the structure of the head, though it seems males are more separated by mandibular structure or the length of individual flagellomeres (and it does seem that flagellomere I is quite elongate). Bohart & Menke (1963)(1) suggest that the males of I. apicalis have the fore femur reddened basally whereas the only red on I. mexicana legs is occasionally on the hind femur.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

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