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Photo#190171
What do you think this is? - Pachnaeus opalus

What do you think this is? - Pachnaeus opalus
Plant City, Hillsborough County, Florida, USA
June 12, 2008
Size: .25"

Images of this individual: tag all
What do you think this is? - Pachnaeus opalus What do you think this is? - Pachnaeus opalus

This is probably Pachnaeus azurescens
Rostrum seems a bit too long for P. opalus but I can't make out the rostral carinae well enough to be positive.

Pachnaeus azurescens is a superficially very similar and apparently very closely related Cuban species that has become established in the past few decades in the area east of Tampa bay. There are a number known Floridian records mostly scattered around the Lakeland area. The primary means to separate the species is sculpture of the epifrons, which isn't clear in most photo records.

Moved

Not Artipus
Rather Pachnaeus opalus

 
please move to the sp. page...
...or request a new one!

 
Thank you
Thanks for the correction Mike. I honestly wasn't sure if Artipus is even known on the gulf coast, but the particularly small size had me thinking Artipus. What is the best way to distinguish these two visually (particulary by photo)? Would it be the slight greenish tint and less mottled elytra?

Entiminae
Appears to be one of the broad-nosed weevils in the subfamily Entiminae. My thoughts would be Artipus floridanus, but the elytra looks too smooth, although the color and the lack of spines on the hind femur is consistent with A. floridanus.

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