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Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

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Books
Data

Family Nymphalidae - Brush-footed Butterflies

 
 
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The Butterflies of North America
By James A. Scott
Stanford University Press, 1986

Distributional notes on the genus Mestra (Nymphalidae) in North America.
By Masters, J.H.
Journal of the Lepidopterists' Society, 24(3): 203-208., 1970
Full PDF

Masters, J.H. 1970. Distributional notes on the genus Mestra (Nymphalidae) in North America. Journal of the Lepidopterists' Society, 24(3): 203-208.

Notes on the life cycle and natural history of Vanessa annabella (Nymphalidae).
By Thomas E. Dimock
Journal of the Lepidoperists' Society 32(2): 88-96, 1978

The biology and laboratory culture of Chlosyne lacinia Geyer (Nymphalidae).
By Drummond, III, B.A., G.L. Bush and T.C. Emmel.
Journal of the Lepidopterists' Society 24(2): 135-142., 1970
Full PDF

Drummond, III, B.A., G.L. Bush and T.C. Emmel. 1970. The biology and laboratory culture of Chlosyne lacinia Geyer (Nymphalidae). Journal of the Lepidopterists' Society 24(2): 135-142.

The nymphalid butterfly, Chlosyne lacinia Geyer, is the most widely distributed species of its genus, ranging from Argentina northward into Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and the Imperial Valley and adjacent desert areas of California (Comstock, 1927; Ehrlich and Ehrlich, 1961). Occasionally it may penetrate as far north as Kansas and Nebraska (Klots, 1951).

A New Limenitis weidemeyerii W. H. Edwards from Southeastern Arizona (Nymphalidae)
By George T. Austin and Douglas Mullins
The Journal of Research on the Lepidoptera, Vol. 22, No. 4, pp. 225-228, 1984

Revision of the Limenitis weidemeyerii complex, with description of a new subspecies (Nymphalidae)
By Stephen F. Perkins and Edwin M. Perkins, Jr.
Journal of the Lepidopterists' Society, Vol. 21, No. 4, pp. 213-234, 1967

A new Hermeuptychia (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Satyrinae) is sympatric and synchronic with H. sosybius ...
By Qian Cong, Nick V. Grishin
ZooKeys, 379: 43–91, 2014
Full title:
A new Hermeuptychia (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Satyrinae) is sympatric and synchronic with H. sosybius in southeast US coastal plains, while another new Hermeuptychia species – not hermes – inhabits south Texas and northeast Mexico.


Abstract & PDF

The Monarch Butterfly - Biology and Conservation
By Karen S. Oberhauser, and Michelle J. Solensky (eds.)
Cornell University Press, 2004

 
 
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