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Photo#193183
BG1591 E1137 - Psilonyx annulatus - male

BG1591 E1137 - Psilonyx annulatus - Male
Gloster, Gloster Arboretum, Amite County, Mississippi, USA
June 15, 2008
Size: body length 8.6 mm.
Our good friend and fellow bug chaser, Dorothea Munchow, returning from a field trip at the Gloster (MS) Arboretum, saw a mosquito-like creature light on the wall near the back door of the guest house. She brought it inside and asked if we were interested. We have been obsessively searching for robber flies in the subfamily Leptogastrinae for several years. We search grassy fields and shaded woods for creatures that look like damselflies, but have long, dangling hind legs, and have had no luck so far. In some ways Dorothea's bug fit the description of the subfamily, but the head seemed wrong for an asilid and in my opinion it was much too small, less than 9 mm. long, while the smallest damselflies are at least 20 mm. long. Upon arriving home, I immediatly photographed the bug as it seemed to be in failing health. Only then did I compare it against information about Leptogastrinae, and discovered that there is at least one species that is smaller that the smallest damselfly!
Based on the size, banded abdomen, and the pattern of banding on the hindlegs, we believe this to be Psilonyx annulatus.
Confirmation/correction would be appreciated.
Gayle

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BG1591 E1137 - Psilonyx annulatus - male BG1591 E1137 - Psilonyx annulatus - male BG1591 E1137 - Psilonyx annulatus - male BG1591 E1137 - Psilonyx annulatus - male BG1591 E1137 - Psilonyx annulatus - male BG1591 E1137 - Psilonyx annulatus - male

It is Psilonyx annulatus (Say
It is Psilonyx annulatus (Say, 1823, that is at least what Torsten Dikow thinks, and he is revising all the Leptogasterinae, so I am pretty sure about this one....

Moved
Moved from Robber Flies.

Leptogastrinae
Cool aren't they? Superb shots as always. Beameromyia and Psilonyx are the tiny ones. Note the empodial differences and facial differences. I think this is a male Psilonyx though. I have yet to catch a Beamer.

See the fine key online here.

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