Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Information, insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#193306
female robust shieldback katydid/Atlanticus gibbosus - Atlanticus monticola - female

female robust shieldback katydid/Atlanticus gibbosus - Atlanticus monticola - Female
fentress County, Tennessee, USA
June 22, 2008
Size: bdy-1.25" w/ovipositor-2"
***
having had a visit by a male Atlanticus testaceus but a few days ago, one might slip into the assumption that this is a female testaceus. but having spent some time now at a number of websites, i find it easy to make other interesting (and perhaps erroneous) assumptions.

to wit: this female, not yet at prime, lacks full color in her legs which, soon enough, will well match the rest of her body. although she is not supposed to be a resident this far north, (see http://buzz.ifas.ufl.edu/282a.htm) she nevertheless is.

did she hitch a ride in a vehicle which started from farther south and deposited her here?

dark coloration as well as ovipositor shape and position proclaim this lady Atlanticus gibbosus: see http://buzz.ifas.ufl.edu/282pf2.htm.

say you 'yea' or 'nay'??

imageminder
***

.
.

definitely not A. gibbosus
looks like a female nymph of A. monticola. The curve of the ovipositor is not obvious at this angle, but is evident.

Moved from Robust Shieldback.

 
*** thank you lee garre
***

thank you

lee garret

***

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.