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Photo#195678
Lejops lineatus - male

Lejops lineatus - Male
Adams County, Pennsylvania, USA
June 28, 2008
Lejops lineatus perhaps? Can someone confirm or correct?

Thanks!

Images of this individual: tag all
Lejops lineatus - male Lejops lineatus - male Lejops lineatus - male

oh and this is also a male!
oh and this is also a male!
cheers
Martin

 
Thanks again...
Martin. Is there a way to know which species have dichoptic eyes? Dumb question I suppose. :)

 
Not a dumb question at all...
Not a dumb question at all...There is no rule... sorry, but most Helophilini (Parhelophilus, Helophilus and Lejops) have dichoptic eyes, and right now I can not think of any other Syrphid with dichoptic eyes (there are some exotic Eumerus I think and Merodon, but not in the US). The same is true for other families, eg in Therevidae the genera Phycus and Ataenogera have dichoptic males, while most other Therevidae have holoptic males.
This is very likely correlated with some swarming/mate finding behavior, but I am not sure if this is completely understood...
Cheers
Martin

 
Great to know....
I will note this for future IDs. It must be difficult for the guys to know which are guys and which are gals. Since there are so many of them I guess they have it figured out. :)

Many thanks,
Bob

 
They do the "finding each oth
They do the "finding each other" part with a lot of pheromones etc and also the males have completely different colors then the females, and of course they know exactly what they are looking for... It takes us a fraction of a second to know if somebody is a man or woman, but if you would try to explain to a blind person or an "alien" how to differentiate between a man or woman just from the face, you would run into real difficulties... think about that ;-)

 
Hmmm
Yep, so true! And I had forgotten about those good old pheromones.

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