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Photo#19633
1 mm black beetle

1 mm black beetle
Nashua, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA
May 31, 2005
Size: 1 mm!
This is a tripod shot with remote activation to reduce camera motion. It shows a little better detail of this tiny, tiny underbark beetle, yet doesn't begin to compare with the sharpness and detail I see in others' images of 1-mm insects. Back to the drawing board!

Yes, I clone-stamped out some white flecks on the beetle's back and replaced some of the chipped paint on the millimeter marks while I was at it. Sorry about that you photographic purists :-)

Notice that several compressed abdominal segments protude beyond elytral edge.

Images of this individual: tag all
1 mm black beetle 1 mm black beetle 1 mm black beetle 1 mm black beetle 1 mm black beetle

Moved
Moved from Abraeinae.

Moved
Moved from Clown Beetles.

Histeridae
I would start with Histeridae. These 1 mm guys are tough!

--Stephen

Stephen Cresswell
Buckhannon, WV
www.stephencresswell.com

 
Yellow antenna terminus
After viewing a number of small histerids online, it ocurred to me that many have yellow-orange balls on the ends of their antennae. That plus the exposed and compressed abdominal segments make Histeridae a stronger possibility. Now to find one that's 1 mm and the right shape ...

 
OK
That's what that tail end reminded me of as well.

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