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Species Rhagoletis cingulata - Eastern Cherry Fruit Fly

Eastern Cherry Fruit Fly - Rhagoletis cingulata Eastern Cherry Fruit Fly - Rhagoletis cingulata fly - Rhagoletis cingulata Eastern Cherry Fruit Fly - Rhagoletis cingulata Rhagoletis species? - Rhagoletis cingulata Eastern Cherry Fruit Fly - Rhagoletis cingulata Rhagoletis cingulata Eastern Cherry Fruit Fly - Rhagoletis cingulata
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Diptera (Flies)
No Taxon ("Acalyptratae")
Superfamily Tephritoidea
Family Tephritidae (Fruit Flies)
Subfamily Trypetinae
Tribe Carpomyini
Subtribe Carpomyina
Genus Rhagoletis
Species cingulata (Eastern Cherry Fruit Fly)
Other Common Names
Cherry maggot (the larva)
Explanation of Names
Author: Loew
Size
4 to 5 mm long
Identification
Black with yellow margins on the thorax; white scutellum; yellowish tibia and tarsi; transverse and oblique black markings on the wings; four white crossbands on the abdomen
Range
From Michigan to New Hampshire, southward to Florida, over the entire middle and eastern region of the United States and in southeastern and south central Canada.
It is of Nearctic origin and has been introduced accidentally in Europe.
Food
the fruits of Rosaceae (Prunus serotina (primary native host) and 6 other spp.)
Life Cycle
Adults emerge from the ground when cherries are half grown, feed on moisture on leaves and fruits at first. Lay eggs, up to 400 eggs. Larvae hatch in five to eight days and tunnel directly to the surface of the cherry seed. They pass through three instars at an average of 11 days at 77°F.