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Photo#19795
Milkweed Stem Weevil - Rhyssomatus palmacollis - female

Milkweed Stem Weevil - Rhyssomatus palmacollis - Female
Milton, Norfolk County, Massachusetts, USA
June 8, 2005
Size: 3.5mm

Images of this individual: tag all
Milkweed Stem Weevil - Rhyssomatus palmacollis - female Milkweed Stem Weevil - Rhyssomatus palmacollis - female

Moved

Rh. palmacollis (Say, 1831)
*

 
Oh, my!
How do you tell the difference between these two species? Are there other misplaced ones? Any info that we can add to the info page? Thanks.
Tom: are you telling Texas ento to change the name on your image?

 
Only mottled northeast species
That's what v says on this picture.
If Mike Quinn has his subscription turned on he should see that the Texas ento page should be changed. If he doesn't reply in a day or so, I'll email him.

Rhyssomatus lineaticollis
Rhyssomatus lineaticollis (Say)

Family Curculionidae, Subfamily Curculioninae, Tribe Molytini

Milkweed Stem Weevil

Photos

More photos from Cedar Creek,

Huge photo!

Rhyssomatus lineaticollis (Coleoptera), are weevils that primarily feed on the stems of A. syriaca. Adults initially feed on the apical leaves and then, after feeding, female weevils walk to lower parts of the stem and chew several sequential holes in the stem, creating a continuous scar. Females lay a single egg per hole and larvae complete development inside the stem while feeding on pith tissue. Oviposition scar length is an accurate predictor of the number of eggs laid by the adult female. (Agrawal, 2005)

MQ, Austin

Texas Beetle Info
TexasEnto.net/beetles.htm

 
Milkweed Stem Weevil
That makes sense, and these were fairly common in the milkweed patches. Thanks for the info Mike.

Cool behavior!
This weevil is draining the milkweed of its toxic latex. It will either feed, oviposit, or both, above the area it has notched, so as not to poison itself. Just an excellent shot, Tom.

 
So that's what is going on he
So that's what is going on here. Thanks for the explanation Eric.

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