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TaxonomyBrowse
Info
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Genus Ommatius

Ommatius tibialis - male Robber Fly Ommatius tibialis? - Ommatius tibialis bvd7Jun10b - Ommatius ouachitensis - male Robber Fly - Ommatius Unknown Asilidae - Ommatius gemma Halfway between fly and dragonfly - Ommatius Robber Fly - Ommatius Insect on seed head - Ommatius
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Diptera (Flies)
No Taxon (Orthorrhapha)
Superfamily Asiloidea
Family Asilidae (Robber Flies)
Subfamily Asilinae
Genus Ommatius
Explanation of Names
Ommatius Wiedemann 1821
a classical name: sources mention an Ommatius involved with the British invasion of Gaul in the 6th century
Numbers
13 spp. in our area, ~310 total(1)
Identification
Medium-sized to small robber flies. Antennae are slightly feathery, like those of a moth, apparently a distinctive character of the genus (among North American genera):
Range
tropics worldwide, with some holarctic representation; most diverse in the Neotropics (>1/3 of all spp.); in our area, across the US, most spp. in sw. US(1)
Season
May-Sep in NC(2)
Print References
Scarbrough A.G. (1990) Revision of the New World Ommatius Wiedemann (Diptera: Asilidae). I. The Pumilus Species Group. Transactions of the American Entomological Society 116(1): 65-102 (abstract)
Internet References
Works Cited
1.Information on robber flies, compiled by F. Geller-Grimm
2.Insects of North Carolina
C.S. Brimley. 1938. North Carolina Department of Agriculture.