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Photo#203377
Hemileuca eglanterina shastaensis caterpillar - Hemileuca eglanterina

Hemileuca eglanterina shastaensis caterpillar - Hemileuca eglanterina
Mt. Shasta, Shasta County, California, USA
July 15, 2008
Size: 50 mm
Fount of bitterbush at about elevation 6500 FT.

Images of this individual: tag all
Hemileuca eglanterina shastaensis caterpillar - Hemileuca eglanterina Hemileuca eglanterina shastaensis caterpillar - Hemileuca eglanterina

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shastaensis
Very nice image of H. e. shastaensis! This is a great addition to the guide page as this subspecies has a limited range.

Beautiful caterpillar
I see you have posted an adult of this species apparently from the same date. Is there any relationship between the two specimens? I'm just wondering if this became the other and the date is not right. If not, can you indicate how the caterpillar ID was made, as it appears to be a new one for us.

 
H. eglanterina shastaensis cat.
The adult moth and the caterpillar came from the same area but are different indiviuals. On Mt. Shasta the eggs hatch from mid-March to early June, they feed on bitterbrush and the larvae can be found at the same time the adults are flying. In the book "The Wild Silk Moths of North America" they state, "These observations indicate that eglanterina shasstaensis has a two-year life cycle. Eggs desposited in the fall overwinter and hatch in early summer. The larvae pupate in late July and August and them overwinter; the adults eclose the folling summer." The I.D. of the caterpillar was made using the description given in this book. The prolegs being a light red was one of the main reason I tried to get a photo of the underside.

Richard

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