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Photo#206774
Haploa - Possible hybrid clymene-confusa 1 - Haploa clymene

Haploa - Possible hybrid clymene-confusa 1 - Haploa clymene
Salisbury, Addison County, Vermont, USA
July 26, 2008
Size: 3cm (w/o antenna)
Are the Haploa known to mate across species? Among butterflies, the genus Heliconius will.

This example seems a bit more than a single mutation in a Haploa clymene, given the several apparent changes in the top wing pattern.

(S)he has the apricot under-wings and white prothorax of Haploa clymene (whereas the colors are reversed in the confusa) -- see specifically this clymene from the gallery...
http://bugguide.net/node/view/118963/bgimage

... but has patterns on the top wings (and to a degree the abdomen) that make him/her a very lightly marked confusa -- see this particular confusa from the gallery...
http://bugguide.net/node/view/124447/bgimage

I've not noticed clymenes before that don't follow the distinctive pattern of their 'cross', with a backwards-curving trailing edge and angular leading edges. Here the pattern is just globular like the confusa.

It also has those small white circles toward the rear of the wing along the centerline, just like the following confusa:
http://bugguide.net/node/view/131511/bgimage

Any experience with this?

I picked this poor critter up off the middle of a dirt road and was about to find a bush for him/her, but all of a sudden I just couldn't remember my Haploa....

Thanks for any further information! It looks as though his/her wing was already broken, so (s)he will be around, in case you want to ask for more detail.

Greenlight
Salisbury, Vermont

Images of this individual: tag all
Haploa - Possible hybrid clymene-confusa 1 - Haploa clymene Haploa - Possible hybrid clymene-confusa 1 - Haploa clymene

Moved
Moved from Haploa.

With these we're never too sure, it is a strange individual indeed. Other arctiidae like Grammia do hybridize frequently and the DNA is a mess on that group. Arctiidae also vary considerably - and you can see some really strange aberrations. All in all, it's probably safe to call this H. clymene with an atypical forewing pattern.

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