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Photo#207665
non-gilled Water Penny Beetle - Ectopria nervosa

non-gilled Water Penny Beetle - Ectopria nervosa
Louden, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, USA
July 27, 2008
Size: about 4 mm
Upon first discovering this fairly translucent larva on the underside of a river rock in the Canterbury River I assumed it was a younger version of the others I was finding. But on viewing through my lens I was impressed by its absence of white gill filaments that the others had. Checking bugguide and American Beetles I am led to conclude this is the other psephenid species and genus that lives in New Hampshire, Ectopria nervosa, described as having no abdominal gills in the larval stage. I note that it is not as elongate as the Ectopria larvae already posted on bugguide so I presume those are not Ectopria nervosa.

Images of this individual: tag all
non-gilled Water Penny Beetle - Ectopria nervosa non-gilled Water Penny Beetle - Ectopria nervosa non-gilled Water Penny Beetle - Ectopria nervosa non-gilled Water Penny Beetle - Ectopria nervosa

Congrats!
You too, got both northern genera in one go. I wish I could know which one mine is. Ontario has three Ectopria species.

 
Thanks, Stephen.
This one appeared to have died so I shot some more images of it and put it in an alcohol vial. The others are hanging in there, preferring to stay right at the waterline on their rock. I collected some algae for them but don't know if they appreciated it.

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