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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Morphology and systematics of North American Blastobasidae (Lepidoptera: Gelechioidea)
By Adamski, D. & R.L. Brown
United States Department of Agriculture, Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station Technical Bulletin, 165: 1-70, 1989
Cite: 2077700 with citation markup [cite:2077700]
Adamski, D. & R.L. Brown, 1989. Morphology and systematics of North American Blastobasidae (Lepidoptera: Gelechioidea). United States Department of Agriculture, Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station Technical Bulletin, 165: 1-70.

Available
This bulletin is listed as available at Mississippi Entomological Museum website. Email coauthor Richard L. Brown for a copy. It includes a key to genera supported by numerous high-resolution drawings and photomicrographs of external features and genitalia needed for genus ID.

When I requested a copy (which I received), Prof. Brown informed me, "the publication deals with the external and internal morphology and the phylogenetic relationships of the genera", "it can’t be used for making species identifications", and "Dave Adamski thinks that more than half of the species in the U.S./Canada are undescribed. He’s been working on a publication that covers all the species of blastobasids, but there’s no set date for finishing this."

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