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Photo#207929
Fly With Bee Colors - Eristalis tenax - male

Fly With Bee Colors - Eristalis tenax - Male
Chicago, Illinois, USA
July 25, 2008
Ok this bug had a body of a fly I am sure of it. But the colors were of a bee

Images of this individual: tag all
Fly With Bee Colors - Eristalis tenax - male Fly With Bee Colors - Eristalis tenax - male

Bee mimic - nice find!
I think it's a syrphid, but can't tell for sure, as it looks different than any I've seen here in California. Syrphids also mimic hornets and wasps.

If you have a shot from above, it will aid in ID. (Wing veins are very important in flies. Patterns on the back are important on syrphids.)

 
It can't be a syrphid. The f
It can't be a syrphid. The fly was a little bigger than a worker honey bee. The other person said a drone fly. Looks more like that, but had more fuzz

 
Andy knows his flies and nailed this one.
Before I lose track, some syrphids are on the large side. (Narcissus bulb fly comes to mind; check it when you get a chance.) But sure, lots are small. A special wing vein says "syrphid" loud and clear.

I'm a little embarassed here, as I've shot this fly, and even shot it from the side. However, my photo throughly sucked and your good shot didn't look familiar to me. (Color my face red.)

So here's another - yours being the first I've noticed - stellar image of the drone fly. And yeah, it's a syrphid.


 
hmm I see. Now that I rememb
hmm I see. Now that I remember, the wings are the same...hmm...Guess it is a drone fly

 
Paul, if you get a chance, drop me an email.
I read your journal and have a suggestion. My address is with my bio here.

 
ID
Isn't this the Drone Fly, Eristalis tenax, a dead-on honey bee mimic?

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