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Species Saperda discoidea - Hickory Saperda

Cerambycidae - Saperda discoidea - male Hickory Saperda - Saperda discoidea - female Long-horned beetle - Saperda discoidea - male Saperda discoidea - Hickory Saperda - Saperda discoidea Pennsylvania Beetle - Cerambycid for ID  - Saperda discoidea - male Pennsylvania Beetle - Cerambycid for ID - Saperda discoidea Another Small Unidentified Cerambycid - Saperda discoidea Hickory Saperda - Saperda discoidea - female
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Coleoptera (Beetles)
Suborder Polyphaga (Water, Rove, Scarab, Long-horned, Leaf and Snout Beetles)
No Taxon (Series Cucujiformia)
Superfamily Chrysomeloidea (Longhorn and Leaf Beetles)
Family Cerambycidae (Longhorn Beetles)
Subfamily Lamiinae (Flat-faced Longhorn Beetles)
Tribe Saperdini
Genus Saperda
Species discoidea (Hickory Saperda)
Explanation of Names
Saperda discoidea Fabricius 1798
Size
9-17 mm(1)
Identification
Remarkably dimorphic(1)
This species is remarkable in having the sexes so unlike that one unacquainted with it would certainly consider them distinct species. In a long series of males, however, there will be found individuals having the same color and markings as the females, and some very poorly developed females lack entirely the characteristic markings of the sex. (Felt & Joutel 1904)
------male------------female-------
Range
e. US, se. CAN - Map (1)(2), rare in Gulf states
Season
Apr-Sep(1)
Food
Larvae feed on Carya, Juglans, and occasionally other hardwoods(3)
Life Cycle
This is a common insect and breeds abundantly in hickory, frequently following the work of the destructive hickory bark borer, Scolytus quadrispinosus Say. It is sometimes so abundant that a piece of bark 6 inches square may contain a dozen or more larvae. (Felt & Joutel 1904)
Remarks
comes to UV lights(1)
Print References
Felt E.P. & L.H. Joutel (1904) Monograph of the genus Saperda. New York State Museum Bulletin 74(20): 3–86. Full Text
Internet References