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Photo#2141011
Microvelia (subgenus Kirkaldya) gerhardi? - Microvelia - male

Microvelia (subgenus Kirkaldya) gerhardi? - Microvelia - Male
Canyon Creek, Clark County, Washington, USA
July 6, 2022
Size: 3.7mm
I found about 50 of these in some little puddles on rock next to Canyon Creek in the ne corner of Clark County, Washington. Elevation is around 1000’. Because of size and the 3 plated pronotum I realized they are subgenus Kirkaldya. Due to range I could narrow it down to gerhardi and californiensis, and the swollen and blackened front femur says it’s gerhardi. I used the key in Smith/Polhemus; 1978 to come to these conclusions, but I’ve never tried to key one of these before, and the key is over 40 years old, so I’m not 100% sure.

Images of this individual: tag all
Microvelia (subgenus Kirkaldya) gerhardi? - Microvelia - male Microvelia (subgenus Kirkaldya) gerhardi? - Microvelia - male Microvelia (subgenus Kirkaldya) gerhardi? - Microvelia - male Microvelia (subgenus Kirkaldya) gerhardi? - Microvelia - male

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

With the lack of data on distribution in this area, I think you should leave it at subgenus. If you also captured a photo illustrating the end of the abdomen ventrally, then that might be more definitive.

 
Yes, you’re undoubtedly correct.
I’ll add a ventral photo. But I’m starting to think this is an unidentifiable female. That genital area doesn’t look like any of the photos in the key.

 
male
It's definitely a male. The genital capsules of both species are very similar and while the front femur may be slightly swollen and darkened, it definitely isn't as dark as specimens I've seen.

Also, I don't know the exact locations where gerhardi was found in Oregon, but it seems to be an interior species being virtually absent from California (only near Tahoe), while beameri and californiensis are found throughout the state, so both those species may be more likely here.

 
Thank you
That’s good information to have. I didn’t even consider beameri.

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