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Photo#215400
Large Grasshopper - Melanoplus sanguinipes - female

Large Grasshopper - Melanoplus sanguinipes - Female
Thompson Falls, Sanders County, Montana, USA
August 14, 2008
Size: 30 mm
Maybe that large pinkish nymph turns into this?

Images of this individual: tag all
Large Grasshopper - Melanoplus sanguinipes - female Large Grasshopper - Melanoplus sanguinipes - female Large Grasshopper - Melanoplus sanguinipes - female Large Grasshopper - Melanoplus sanguinipes - female Large Grasshopper - Melanoplus sanguinipes - female

Moved

Well - it's a girl !
now what species is it? I'm going to say probably Melanoplus sanguinipes. The markings are bit striking for that species, but it looks a lot like the male from the same place (and it's pretty much for sure as to species), and I think I can see a bit of a hump under the front of the thorax, which is also common in females of this species and very few others (it's characteristic of the males of this species). The sort of bluish-greenish-gray of the face and sides is very common in this species as well. I think part of the "large" is that abdomen that looks to be full of eggs.

 
Thanks
I added one more view. I don't know if it will help or not.

 
The hump
definitely shows in the last photo. It's not prominent, but it's there. Based on coloration and matching males, I think it's pretty sure that this is M. sanguinipes. You've got some of the prettiest ones I've seen up there.

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