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Photo#216040
male arenivaga - Arenivaga apacha - male

male arenivaga - Arenivaga apacha - Male
Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona, USA
August 20, 2008
Size: 1.6 cm
Found in a museum hallway, we had a female last month. Does anyone know what they eat?

Heidi Hopkins says, "most likely A. apacha."
Moved from Arenivaga.

not sure at all.
but some males of these desert roaches seem to be quite short-living (in contrast to their mates) -- but try lettuce and, say, an oatmeal cookie -- never hurts

 
cookies sound delicious!
Sorry, my question about their eating habits mislead. I'm worried about what kinds of materials they might eat in a museum, such as cardboard or our paper archives. All I've found is that the little guys like to eat organic materials. Was wondering if anyone has had experience with them eating any particular material so I can keep my eyes open. Thanks, the oatmeal cookies really do sound good!

 
i'm pretty sure Arenivaga, unlike many other roaches,
wouldn't even survive in buildings. males fly to lights, but that's about it. they're nothing to worry about in terms of damage

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