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Discussion of 2018 gathering

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa

Photos from the 2010 Workshop in Grinnell, Iowa

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Books
Data

Species Somatochlora franklini - Delicate Emerald

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Dragonflies Through Binoculars: A Field Guide to Dragonflies of North America
By Sidney W. Dunkle
Oxford Press, 2000

Dragonflies of the World
By Jill Silsby
Smithsonian Institution Press, 2001

Naïades et exuvies des libellules du Québec : clé de détermination des genres.
By Hutchinson, Raymond & Benoît Ménard
Entomofaune du Québec (EQ) inc., 2016
This practical guide provides a vast wealth of knowledge for the Francophone naturalist. It allows the identification and study of dragonfly naiads, either as underwater nymphs, or as exuviae left by new adults. The proposed identification key, creative and generously illustrated, allows to differentiate with confidence the 52 Zygoptera and Anisoptera genera found in Quebec and adjacent regions.
See a few pages here

A Field Guide to the Damselflies & Dragonflies of Arizona and Sonora
By Rich Bailowitz, Doug Danforth, Sandy Upson
Nova Granada Publications, 2015
Available from BioQuip

Odonata at risk in conterminous United States and Canada.
By Bick, G.H.
Odonatologica 12(3): 209-226., 1983
Bick, G.H. 1983. Odonata at risk in conterminous United States and Canada. Odonatologica 12(3): 209-226.

Abstract
32 spp. (8% of the odon. fauna) considered to be at risk in the United States and Canada are assigned to Red Data Book categories as follows: Rare-20 (62%), Vulnerable-5 (16%), Endangered-3 (9%), Insufficiently known-3 (9%), Probably extinct-I (3%). Most (82%) of the threatened spp. are associated with flowing water. The loss of high-quality, undisturbed streams is the most significant actor endangering odonates in the US and Canada. The threatened spp. occur in 3 eastern Canadian Provinces and in 31 states, most of which are east of the Mississippi River.

National review of state wildlife action plans for Odonata species of greatest conservation need.
By Bried, J.T. and C.A. Mazzacano.
Insect Conservation and Diversity 3(2): 61–71., 2010
Bried, J.T. and C.A. Mazzacano. (2010). National review of state wildlife action plans for Odonata species of greatest conservation need. Insect Conservation and Diversity 3(2): 61–71.

Keywords: Conservation; damselflies; dragonflies; rare species

Abstract. 
1. The overarching goal of United States wildlife action plans is to prevent wildlife from becoming endangered or declining to levels where recovery becomes unlikely. Effective plan implementation depends on establishing Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN), defined as wildlife species with small or declining populations or other characteristics that make them vulnerable.

Dragonflies of Texas A Field Guide.
By John C. Abbott.
University of Texas Press, Austin. 466 pp., 2015
Abbott, J.C. 2015. Dragonflies of Texas A Field Guide. University of Texas Press, Austin. 466 pp.

UT Press page

Dragonflies of Texas is the definitive field guide to these insects. It covers all 160 species with in situ photographs and detailed anatomical images as needed.

Each species is given a two-page spread that includes photographs of both sexes and known variations when possible, key features, a distribution map, identification, discussion of similar species, status in Texas, habitat, seasonality, and general comments. Many of the groups also have comparative plates that show anatomically distinctive characteristics.

The classification and diversity of dragonflies and damselflies (Odonata). In: Zhang Z.-Q. (ed.) Animal biodiversity:...
By Dijkstra KDB, Bechly G, Bybee SM, Dow RA, Dumont HJ, Fleck G, Garrison RW, Hämäläinen M, Kalkman VJ, Karube H, May ML, Orr AG
Zootaxa 3703: 036–045, 2013

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